Steve Spangler, the Science Guy

SCIENCE GUY: Making a cloud

9:15 AM, Nov 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO - The fifth and final installment with the Science Guy Steve Spangler involved liquid nitrogen and the creation of a huge cloud right in the News10 studio.

 

SCIENCE GUY: How to blast out ink stains

9:15 AM, Nov 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO - The Science Guy Steve Spangler sprayed and then ended up freeze drying News10's Melissa Crowley in his latest experiment.

SCIENCE GUY: Becoming a conductor of electricity

9:14 AM, Nov 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO - The Science Guy Steve Spangler showed News10's Keba Arnold that you don't need an outlet to produce electricity. 

SCIENCE GUY: Freezing power of liquid nitrogen

9:14 AM, Nov 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO -  Who knew a cracker would make your mouth smoke when cooled to minus-345 degrees Fahrenheit?  The Science Guy Steve Spangler knew.

SCIENCE GUY: Lighting hands on fire

9:13 AM, Nov 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO, CA - The Science Guy Steve Spangler lit Melissa Crowley's hands on fire, much to her surprise, in his latest hands-on experiment.

SCIENCE GUY: Giant smoke rings

8:35 AM, May 6, 2011

Who doesn't want to be the hit of the party?! Science Guy Steve Spangler shows News10's Dan Elliott how to make giant smoke rings -- and knock cups off his co-anchors' heads in the process!

SCIENCE GUY: Sick science - burn your money

5:11 AM, May 5, 2011

SACRAMENTO - What happens when you light a $20 bill on fire? It's supposed to go up in flames, but the Science Guy Steve Spangler shows us that's not always the case.

PHOTOS: SCIENCE GUY: Burning Money

4:49 AM, May 5, 2011

SCIENCE GUY: The Egg Drop Trick

11:10 AM, May 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO - Science Guy Steve Spangler shows us how eggs, a tray, some water and other household items can teach children about the law of inertia.

PHOTOS: SCIENCE GUY: Egg drop trick: Law of Inertia

5:20 AM, May 4, 2011

SACRAMENTO - Science Guy Steve Spangler and News10's Dan Elliott look at what eggs, a tray, glasses of water and other household items have to do with the law of inertia.

SCIENCE GUY: Soda can shake-up

10:53 AM, May 3, 2011

SACRAMENTO - Have you ever wondered why shaking a soda results in a great explosion when it's opened?

To learn more about this experiment click here.

 Check out the Science Guy Soda Can photos

SCIENCE GUY: Anti-helium, the heavy gas

10:51 AM, May 3, 2011

SACRAMENTO - Science Guy Steve Spangler looks at the science behind using helium to make you sound like a cartoon character and wonders what might happen to sound that travels through a gas that is six times heavier than air.

PHOTOS: Anti-Helium - The Heavy Gas

3:24 AM, May 3, 2011

SACRAMENTO - Everyone knows how inhaling helium from a balloon changes your voice. Helium is six times lighter than the normal air we breathe. But what would happen if you inhaled a non-toxic gas that was six times heavier than air?

SCIENCE GUY: Electric Step Stool - Human Spark

4:36 PM, Apr 28, 2011

Mark and Amelia test their bravery as Steve Spangler generates 50,000 volts of electricity. The secret to his safety is a lesson in the properties of static electricity. Science is not for sissies!

See the experiment.

SCIENCE GUY: Ethanol Explosion

4:34 PM, Apr 28, 2011

If you've been to certain gas stations recently, you may have seen that some of your gasoline is getting a special additive called ethanol. Like gasoline, ethanol is easily ignited and creates a lot of energy while it burns.

But here's the hitch, ethanol burns cleaner than gasoline. It's a little step that fuel companies are taking towards going green. This experiment will show you just how combustible ethanol is and why it's a great additive for fuel.

See the experiment.

SCIENCE GUY: Science of Bouncing Balls

4:32 PM, Apr 28, 2011

It's the simplest of all toys... a rubber ball. But not all rubber balls are created equally. Steve Spangler joins Mark for a little test in hand-to-eye coordination.

See the experiment.

SCIENCE GUY: Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream

4:29 PM, Apr 28, 2011

There's lots of specialty ice cream shops out there, but our science guy, Steve Spangler, recently discovered a Denver area restaurant that uses liquid nitrogen to mix up an instant batch of perfect ice cream.

See the experiment